Tag Archives: work

Introducing #Webizen electoral college

3 Apr

In a previous post “Individuals influencer of the Web at W3C –utopia?”, I drew up some balance sheet of possibilities for individuals to affiliate with the Web community.

What started as a simple fan club design is evolving into something far more appealing, which is re-aligning with my initial interest of individuals having a voice in the Consortium.

One of the key components of the W3C is the Advisory Committee, composed of one representative from each W3C Member. The Advisory Committee has a number of roles described in the W3C Process: review, appeal, vote.

So, what if we told you that Webizens can run for an Advisory Committee position?

The draft proposal is built in a wiki, the sections of particular relevance are:

The section on Package of benefits hasn’t been updated in a while and might need your input as well. And if you have an opinion on a communication strategy, you’ll be my best friend forever!

The design of the framework is still work in progress, is done in the open and public participation is free. We target to deliver a proposal by early June.

I am seeking feedback and comments, and thank you kindly for it! You may:

  • comment in this blog,
  • write to the public-webizen@w3.org mailing list (publicly archive),
  • edit the wiki directly,
  • even use IRC (irc.w3.org, port 6665, channel #webizen).
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Individuals influencer of the Web at W3C –utopia?

13 Feb

Can individuals join the W3C? Yes. There is an item precisely on that in the W3C Membership FAQ:

Can I join W3C as an individual?
Yes, by following the same procedure available to organizations. W3C does not have a class of Membership tailored to or priced for individuals. Indeed, the Membership fee is relatively small compared to the investment being made by the organization. Our processes are designed for organizational participation and we do not have the support structure to handle large numbers of individual members. Public participation in W3C is possible in a number of ways other than as an individual Member. Note that academics who are experts in a field may ask the Working Group Chair to be invited to join the Working Group as an Invited Expert.

We do allow individuals to join as organizations. It appears to be under the banner of the Startup Level; which fee ($2,250 / €1950) is for organizations of 10 or fewer employees, but is only available for the first 2 consecutive years of Membership. I have no idea what happens at the end of the second year of Membership of our individual who joined under the level of a Startup. But this is beside the point, anyway.

I’ve always been keen on the notion of individual W3C Members, as opposed to W3C Member organizations.

If I were not employed by the W3C, I would want to join as an individual Member. Not just to show support, but to influence the Web at my level. As a user. By that, I mean from the perspective of the user, as opposed to the one of corporate or business strategy.

The question came up again at the public W3C Plenary session in Shenzhen last November. Look for “individual membership“. Alex Russell (a W3C TAG elected member) brought up the question and garnered replies from both Tim Berners-Lee (Director of the W3C, inventor of the Web –my boss ♡ <swoon />) and Jeff Jaffe (W3C CEO).

As minuted, Alex’s points included professional affiliation (publicly affiliated w/ W3C), utility and the responsibilities it implies (one issue is we don’t have sufficient representation from UI).

As minuted, Tim’s points and support included receiving e-mail from people who want to join, prestige derived from being a Member, which could be limited to read-only membership, and would still allow one to see what’s going on; or a separate level where you’ve got a W3C account where you can be allowed to read-write. Tim, the Director, said “I’d be happy to revisit this.”

The question also came up mid-January outside of W3C. There was a discussion between a group of French-speaking actors of the Web, which started on Twitter and ended up on a web-based collaborative real-time editor, around the topic of Artisans du Web (Web craftspeople), and how they could assemble and represent their craft at the W3C to further the progress of the Web.

I wonder who else, and how many, would join as an individual Member of the W3C. And what role they’d want to play, which participation rights they’d expect.

Update 2014-02-20:

In Feb – May 2014, a task force open to the public is going to develop a proposal around a W3C Webizen Program. I have joined the task force today (it has not yet started, so if you’re keen on the topic, please, join!)

Quoting from the public wiki:

It was proposed during TPAC 2013 that we should have an Individual Membership program at W3C. W3C management concluded that we did not need a program which conferred the participation rights of Membership to individuals, since we already have Invited Experts.

Instead, we are looking to explore a “Webizen” program. For a nominal fee (e.g. $100 US per annum), the individual would get some benefits. This project will explore whether such a program is viable and want the benefits should be.

Sample benefits could include: user groups, user conferences, T-shirts, ID-cards, a path to provide user input to Working Groups, recognition as a Webizen for participants in W3C Working Groups and Community Groups.

To join: subscribe to public-webizen@w3.org

Opera is no longer my default browser, Firefox is

16 Jul

I made a big jump last night when I transitioned from Opera to Firefox as default browser.

It is a big deal for me and using Opera is so ingrained that I have a bit of a writer’s block.

I started to use Opera 7 in March 2003. As I was using Opera M2 (the built-in mail client) it very soon became my default browser, all the way through Opera 12.16, until last night.

My favourite Opera features:

I’m scanning the Opera version history, and peruse the list of wonderful features my browser had. Here are my rock stars:

  • Sessions (1.0)
  • Nicknames (3.0)
  • Tabbed browsing (4.0)
  • Zoom (2.10)
  • M2 e-mail (7.0)
  • Drag-and-Drop of Tabs (7.0)
  • Panels (7.0)
  • Notes (7.10)
  • Wand manager (7.10)
  • RSS newsfeeds (7.50) & Atom news feeder support (8.0)
  • Fit to Window Width (8.0)
  • opera:config (9.0)
  • Widgets (9.0)
  • Opera Dragonfly debugger (9.50)
  • Opera Quick Find (9.50)
  • Alternative tab-closing behaviors (9.50)
  • Follow/Ignore threads and contacts (9.60)
  • Go To Thread (9.60)
  • Visual tabs (10.0)
  • Tab stacking (11.0)
  • Grouping and pinning of messages (11.60)
  • opera:cpu (12.0)

Between Opera and I, it’s become complicated

A few months back I heard the news that Opera was going to ship a browser based on a different engine (It has started in the meantime). Opera then shipped a stand-alone Mail application, which I’ve been using since then. Although there is still a little dev planned for the Opera 12.x series, it is a matter of time until Opera suggests its users upgrade to the Chromium based version.

But already before that, my using Opera had become an act of faith. I have migrated the same profile over the years –ten years. The Opera folder that is in my Library/Application Support/ folder has 144K items and occupies 8.17 GB on disk. Most of which is mail storage, but still, that too was migrated in each major Opera update. I have had strange bugs, common bugs, found work-arounds, etc. Up to a certain point, there was no more satisfaction in having yet another bug to work around.

An act of faith, I wrote. Yes. For some reason, Opera has become even less stable on my machine during the Fall or Winter. It would crash both during usage or when running in the background. It would crash and crash while restarting. Every time it restarted after crash I had to restart it properly otherwise clicking links in other apps had no result.

Everything put together, the cost of troubleshooting overpowers the rest, and the browser has already become foreign to me as much of the rock star features that truly made Opera my default browser are not yet available in the current release. Exit Opera. Enters Firefox.

Hooking up with Firefox

Of the browsers I use, I’ve made Firefox my default browser last night. I sorted a bit the existing bookmarks, made a backup. I sorted through my 90+ open tabs in Opera, saved them as a bookmark folder, exported my Opera bookmarks as HTML and imported this in Firefox. I went trough the preferences, grouped my tabs, place the windows where appropriate, reduced the size of icons and page zoom (struggled a bit for the latter, as I want to rely the least on add-ons). And that is it.

So this morning, rehab has started, so to speak, and there are a few things that I am still wrestling with:

  • Missing the ability to see all 90+ tabs in one bar & Tab Stacking
  • Missing the Tab trash (but History is good enough)
  • Missing Opera Notes
  • Dreading to re-set expectations in terms of search (history, bookmarks)

I wrote ‘rehab’ mostly because I have to adjust ten years or so worth of habits with a given tool. There are equivalent features in Firefox, I just need to find them and get used to them. There are other ways to work, too, that I’m considering to explore. And if it doesn’t work for me, I’ll just quit my job and try to make a living out of photography. I’m jesting. I’ll just go and try out another browser.